skip to main content
NSW Syllabuses

Science K–10 (inc. Science and Technology K–6) - Life Skills - Knowledge and Understanding Living World

Living World: Structure and Function

Outcomes

A student:

  • SCLS-17LW

    recognises features of living and non-living things

  • SCLS-18LW

    identifies structures of living things and their functions

Related Stage 4/5 outcomes: SC4-14LW, SC5-14LW

Content

  • There are differences within and between living things.
  • Living and non-living things
  • Students:
  • group things according to whether they are living or non-living
  • recognise living things and non-living things at home, at school and in the community
  • recognise the ways that living and non-living things are different, eg growing and reproducing
  • Features of living things
  • Students:
  • recognise the two main groups of living things (animals and plants)
  • identify a variety of plants and animals in the local environment
  • describe characteristics of living things, eg living things grow and change, use food, use water and air, respond to changes and reproduce
  • compare the similarities and differences in the needs of living things, eg plants need sunlight and water, animals need food and water CCT
  • identify some external features of animals and/or plants
  • classify a variety of living things according to their observable features, eg vertebrates (mammals, reptiles, fish, birds) and invertebrates (insects, spiders, snails) CCT
  • represent the classification of living things in a variety of ways, eg diagrams and tables NL
  • participate in and/or investigate ways to care for an identified living thing PSC
  • identify some micro-organisms in the environment, eg bacteria and viruses SE
  • outline some beneficial and harmful effects that micro-organisms can have on living things, eg contribution to health, production of useful products and disease SE
  • explore ways that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples classify plants or animals AHC
  • Changes in living things
  • Students:
  • recognise that living things have life cycles
  • observe changes that occur in a plant and/or animal over time, eg by comparing a living adult with its offspring
  • observe the stages in the life cycle of a common animal and/or plant
  • represent stages in the life cycle of a common animal and/or plant in a variety of ways L
  • Living things have structures that carry out specialised functions.
  • Plants
  • Students:
  • observe some structures in plants, eg root, stem and leaf
  • appreciate that the structures in a plant serve a specific function, eg the hardness of a stem provides support and transport of water and nutrients, and leaves absorb light and make food
  • Animals
  • Students:
  • recognise some external structures of animals, eg fur, feathers, hard shells, skin and limbs
  • communicate the function of some basic external structures of animals, eg limbs are used for moving
  • identify some major organs of the body, eg the organs of the skeletal/muscular, circulatory, digestive, respiratory, excretory, reproductive and/or nervous systems
  • describe the functions of some major organs of the body
  • explore the consequences of damage to an organ or system CCT
  • identify factors that are important in maintaining a healthy body, eg exercise and diet PSC

Living World: Human Body

Outcomes

A student:

  • SCLS-19LW

    explores ways in which science and technology have improved human health

Related Stage 4/5 outcomes: SC4-14LW, SC5-14LW

Content

  • Scientific and technological developments have affected the functioning of the human body.
  • Students:
  • recognise that humans need clean air, water, food and shelter
  • identify an issue that could affect the functioning of the human body, eg eating food that has not been prepared or stored appropriately, eating a balanced diet, maintaining oral hygiene or protecting the skin from sun damage PSC
  • investigate ways to maintain a healthy body PSC
  • investigate how scientific developments have changed or influenced the way people look after their bodies, eg the use of sunscreen to prevent sunburn, gym equipment to exercise different parts of the body, refrigeration to store food, immunisation to prevent disease, or safety helmets and seatbelts CCTPSCICT
  • identify some responses of the body to infectious and non-infectious diseases
  • communicate how advances in science and technology have improved our understanding of the causes and control of some infectious diseases L

Living World: Environment

Outcomes

A student:

  • SCLS-20LW

    explores the interactions of living things with each other and the environment

  • SCLS-21LW

    investigates the effect of science and technology on the environment

Related Stage 4/5 outcomes: SC4-15LW, SC5-15LW

Content

  • Living things depend on each other and on the environment.
  • Students:
  • recognise that living things need food
  • recognise that food is a source of energy for animals
  • recognise that sunlight is a source of energy for plants
  • explore the ways in which plants use sunlight to make their own food
  • investigate the needs of living things as they grow, eg the effect of light and water on plants
  • describe a simple food chain, eg plant is food for caterpillar which is food for magpie
  • represent simple food chains in a variety of ways, such as a pictorial representation or flowchart, eg plant → caterpillar → magpie N
  • recognise an ecosystem in the local environment
  • identify the relationships between plants and animals within an ecosystem SE
  • participate in an investigation of an ecosystem through constructing and observing an ecosystem or experiencing an existing ecosystem
  • identify how a particular habitat in the local environment is used by plants and animals
  • identify the features of a variety of living things that make them suited to their environment, eg nocturnal behaviour or webbed feet for swimming
  • explore how some features of a common plant and/or animal help it to survive in its environment CCT
  • identify the roles of producers (plants), consumers (animals) and decomposers (fungi) in an identified ecosystem (rock pool or garden)
  • observe the decomposition process through building and maintaining a compost heap or worm farm
  • communicate the purpose of decomposition, eg natural recycling of materials L
  • identify materials that are cycled within an ecosystem, including water and carbon dioxide
  • Human activity can affect how an ecosystem functions.
  • Students:
  • recognise waste, including personal and school waste or waste in the local community
  • engage with an ecosystem to recognise the effects of particular waste, eg plastic bags and bottles in the school environment, fishing lines and hair ties in rivers and streams, and oil and grease in drains SECC
  • respond to ways to reduce the effect of waste on an ecosystem, eg putting rubbish in the bin, using biodegradable detergents and plastics, and exploring alternatives to dumping oil and grease into drains that feed rivers and streams SEPSC
  • explore positive and negative changes to the environment as a result of human activity, eg building cities, farms and roads, fishing or pollution SECCEU
  • recognise the difference between native and introduced species of plants and animals
  • explore ways that the introduction of plant or animal species, eg rabbits and boneseed, has affected a local ecosystem SE
  • participate in an investigation to reduce the effect of human activity on an environment, eg tree planting in the school or local environment  SECC
  • participate in and/or investigate caring for an ecosystem, eg planting trees or constructing fences to protect the habitat SEPSC