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NSW Syllabuses

Mathematics K–10 - Stage 2 - Measurement and Geometry Position

Position 1

Outcomes

A student:

  • MA2-1WM

    uses appropriate terminology to describe, and symbols to represent, mathematical ideas

  • MA2-17MG

    uses simple maps and grids to represent position and follow routes, including using compass directions

Content

  • Students:
  • Create and interpret simple grid maps to show position and pathways (ACMMG065)
  • describe the location of an object using more than one descriptor, eg 'The book is on the third shelf and second from the left' L
  • use given directions to follow routes on simple maps L
  • use and follow positional and directional language (Communicating) L
  • use grid references on maps to describe position, eg 'The lion cage is at B3' L
  • use grid references in games (Communicating) L
  • identify and mark particular locations on maps and plans, given their grid references
  • draw and label a grid on a given map
  • discuss the use of grids in real-world contexts, eg zoo map, map of shopping centre (Reasoning) L
  • draw simple maps and plans from an aerial view, with and without labelling a grid, eg create a map of the classroom CCT
  • create simple maps and plans using digital technologies (Communicating) ICT
  • compare different methods of identifying locations in the environment, eg compare the reference system used in Aboriginal Country maps with standard grid-referenced maps (Reasoning) LAHC
  • draw and describe routes or paths on grid-referenced maps and plans L
  • use digital technologies involving maps, position and paths (Communicating) ICT
  • interpret and use simple maps found in factual texts and in the media L

Background Information

By convention when using grid-reference systems, such as those found on maps, the horizontal component of direction is named first, followed by the vertical component. This is a precursor to introducing coordinates on the Cartesian plane in Stage 3 Patterns and Algebra, where the horizontal coordinate is recorded first, followed by the vertical coordinate.

Aboriginal people use an Aboriginal land map to identify and explain the relationship of a particular Aboriginal Country to significant landmarks in the area. They use a standard map of New South Wales to identify nearby towns and their proximity to significant Aboriginal landmarks, demonstrating their unique relationship to land, Country and place.

Language

Students should be able to communicate using the following language: position, location, map, plan, path, route, grid, grid reference, aerial view, directions.

National Numeracy Learning Progression links to this Mathematics outcome

When working towards the outcome MA2‑17MG the sub-elements (and levels) of Positioning and locating (PoL2-PoL4) describe observable behaviours that can aid teachers in making evidence-based decisions about student development and future learning.

The progression sub-elements and indicators can be viewed by accessing the National Numeracy Learning Progression.

Position 2

Outcomes

A student:

  • MA2-1WM

    uses appropriate terminology to describe, and symbols to represent, mathematical ideas

  • MA2-17MG

    uses simple maps and grids to represent position and follow routes, including using compass directions

Content

  • Students:
  • Use simple scales, legends and directions to interpret information contained in basic maps (ACMMG090)
  • use a legend (or key) to locate specific objects on a map L
  • use a compass to find north and then east, south and west
  • use N, E, S and W to indicate north, east, south and west, respectively, on a compass rose
  • use an arrow to represent north on a map
  • determine the directions north, east, south and west when given one of the directions
  • use north, east, south and west to describe the location of a particular object in relation to another object on a simple map, given an arrow that represents north, eg 'The treasure is east of the cave' L
  • use NE, SE, SW and NW to indicate north-east, south-east, south-west and north-west, respectively, on a compass rose, eg 
    The image shows a compass rose that indicates N, S, E, W, NE, SE, SW and NW. L
  • determine the directions NE, SE, SW and NW when given one of the directions
  • use north-east, south-east, south-west and north-west to describe the location of an object on simple maps, given a compass rose, eg 'The tree is south-west of the sign' L
  • calculate the distance between two points on a map using a simple given scale
  • use scales involving multiples of 10 to calculate the distance between two points on maps and plans
  • interpret simple scales on maps and plans, eg 'One centimetre on the map represents one metre in real life' (Reasoning) L
  • give reasons for using a particular scale on a map or plan (Communicating, Reasoning) CCT
  • recognise that the same location can be represented by maps or plans using different scales CCT

Background Information

Students need to have experiences identifying north from a compass in their own environment and then determining the other three key directions: east, south and west. This could be done in the playground before introducing students to using these directions on maps to describe the positions of various places. The four directions NE, SE, SW and NW could then be introduced to assist with descriptions of places that lie between N, E, S and W.

Language

Students should be able to communicate using the following language: position, location, map, plan, legend, key, scale, directions, compass, compass rose, north, east, south, west, north-east, south-east, south-west, north-west.

The word 'scale' has different meanings in different contexts. Scale could mean the enlargement or reduction factor for a drawing, the scale marked on a measuring device, a fish scale or a musical scale.

National Numeracy Learning Progression links to this Mathematics outcome

When working towards the outcome MA2‑17MG the sub-elements (and levels) of Comparing units (CoU2) and Positioning and locating (PoL5) describe observable behaviours that can aid teachers in making evidence-based decisions about student development and future learning.

The progression sub-elements and indicators can be viewed by accessing the National Numeracy Learning Progression.