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NSW Syllabuses

Mathematics K–10 - Stage 2 - Measurement and Geometry Time

Time 1

Outcomes

A student:

  • MA2-1WM

    uses appropriate terminology to describe, and symbols to represent, mathematical ideas

  • MA2-13MG

    reads and records time in one-minute intervals and converts between hours, minutes and seconds

Content

  • Students:
  • Tell time to the minute and investigate the relationship between units of time (ACMMG062)
  • recognise the coordinated movements of the hands on an analog clock, including:
  • the number of minutes it takes for the minute hand to move from one numeral to the next
  • the number of minutes it takes for the minute hand to complete one revolution
  • the number of minutes it takes for the hour hand to move from one numeral to the next
  • the number of minutes it takes for the minute hand to move from the 12 to any other numeral
  • the number of seconds it takes for the second hand to complete one revolution
  • read analog and digital clocks to the minute, including using the terms 'past' and 'to', eg 7:35 is read as 'seven thirty-five' or 'twenty-five to eight' L
  • record in words various times shown on analog and digital clocks L

Background Information

The duration of a solar year is actually 365 days 5 hours 48 minutes and 45.7 seconds.

Language

Students should be able to communicate using the following language: time, clock, analog, digital, hour hand, minute hand, second hand, revolution, numeral, hour, minute, second, o'clock, (minutes) past, (minutes) to.

National Numeracy Learning Progression links to this Mathematics outcome

When working towards the outcome MA2‑13MG the sub-elements (and levels) of Measuring time (MeT3) describe observable behaviours that can aid teachers in making evidence-based decisions about student development and future learning.

The progression sub-elements and indicators can be viewed by accessing the National Numeracy Learning Progression.

Time 2

Outcomes

A student:

  • MA2-1WM

    uses appropriate terminology to describe, and symbols to represent, mathematical ideas

  • MA2-2WM

    selects and uses appropriate mental or written strategies, or technology, to solve problems

  • MA2-13MG

    reads and records time in one-minute intervals and converts between hours, minutes and seconds

Content

  • Students:
  • Convert between units of time (ACMMG085)
  • convert between units of time and recall time facts, eg 60 seconds = 1 minute, 60 minutes = 1 hour, 24 hours = 1 day
  • explain the relationship between the size of a unit and the number of units needed, eg fewer hours than minutes will be needed to measure the same duration of time (Communicating, Reasoning) CCT
  • Use am and pm notation and solve simple time problems (ACMMG086)
  • record digital time using the correct notation, including am and pm, eg 9:15 am L
  • describe times given using am and pm notation in relation to 'midday' (or 'noon') and 'midnight', eg '3:15 pm is three and a quarter hours after midday' (Communicating) L
  • relate analog notation to digital notation for time, eg ten to nine in the morning is the same time as 8:50 am L
  • solve simple time problems using appropriate strategies, eg calculate the time spent on particular activities during the school day CCT
  • Read and interpret simple timetables, timelines and calendars
  • read and interpret timetables and timelines LCCTPSC
  • read and interpret calendars LCCTPSC
  • explore and use different notations to record the date (Communicating) LPSCIU
  • explore and use the various date input and output options of digital technologies (Communicating) ICTPSC

Background Information

Midday and midnight need not be expressed in am or pm form. '12 noon' or '12 midday' and '12 midnight' should be used, even though 12:00 pm and 12:00 am are sometimes seen.

The terms 'am' and 'pm' are used only for the digital form of time recording and not with the 'o'clock' terminology.

It is important to note that there are many different forms used in recording dates, including abbreviated forms.

Different notations for dates are used in different countries, eg 8 December 2014 is usually recorded as 8/12/14 in Australia, but as 12/8/14 in the United States of America.

Refer also to background information in Time 1.

Language

Students should be able to communicate using the following language: calendar, date, timetable, timeline, time, hour, minute, second, midday, noon, midnight, am (notation), pm (notation).

The term 'am' is derived from the Latin ante meridiem, meaning 'before midday', while 'pm' is derived from the Latin post meridiem, meaning 'after midday'.

National Numeracy Learning Progression links to this Mathematics outcome

When working towards the outcome MA2‑13MG the sub-elements (and levels) of Measuring time (MeT2, MeT4) describe observable behaviours that can aid teachers in making evidence-based decisions about student development and future learning.

The progression sub-elements and indicators can be viewed by accessing the National Numeracy Learning Progression.