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NSW Syllabuses

History K–10 - Life Skills The Making of the Modern World

Outcomes

A student:

  • HTLS-3

    investigates how people lived in various societies from the past

  • HTLS-4

    explores the features of a particular society or time

  • HTLS-6

    explores the significance of changes and developments in the past

  • HTLS-7

    recognises a variety of historical sources

  • HTLS-8

    uses sources to understand the past

  • HTLS-9

    recognises different perspectives of people, events and issues

  • HTLS-11

    uses historical terms to describe the past

  • HTLS-12

    investigates the past using historical skills

  • HTLS-13

    selects and uses a variety of strategies to organise and communicate information about the past

Related Stage 4/5 outcomes: HT5-1, HT5-2, HT5-4, HT5-5, HT5-6, HT5-7, HT5-9, HT5-10

The following options provide a possible framework for addressing the content of this topic area and are suggestions only.

The options relate to Stage 5 Depth Studies 1, 2 and 3.

Note: These suggested options do not cover Stage 5 Topic 1c: Progressive ideas and movements. Teachers may choose to develop ideas and concepts from this area to address Life Skills outcomes if appropriate.

Making a Better World?

  • The Industrial Revolution
    OR
  • Movement of peoples

OR

Australia and Asia

  • Making a nation
    OR
  • Asia and the world

OR

Australians at War (World Wars I and II)

 

 

 

  • Suggested Site Studies include:
  • a museum visit
  • a local site of significance
  • an Aboriginal site (issues of access and permission need to be appropriate to the site selected)
  • a streetscape/heritage site
  • an historical reconstruction site
  • a virtual historical site
  • a virtual archaeological site
  • Old Parliament House, Canberra ACT
  • a State Parliament House
  • Parliament House, Canberra ACT
  • Students explore some of the changes in the ways people lived, worked and thought during this time, as Australia emerged as a nation.

    Making a Better World? – The Industrial Revolution (1750–1914)

  • Technological advances arising from the Industrial Revolution
  • Students:
  • recognise technological innovations in everyday life, eg computer, television, microwave, radio, mobile phone, interactive whiteboard, PECS ICT
  • recognise the ways in which one or more technological innovations have improved our everyday life ICT
  • engage with one or more technological innovations to perform a task ICT
  • recognise one or more technological inventions that occurred during the Industrial Revolution, eg the steam engine, sewing machine, telephone, aeroplane ICTN
  • investigate one or more technological inventions from the Industrial Revolution and the impact this has had on the lives of ordinary people, using ICT and other sources as appropriate CCTICT
  • explore how the Industrial Revolution affected the everyday life of people during that time, eg growth of towns and cities, development of transport systems, working conditions in factories, changed social conditions CCTICT
  • recognise different perspectives of groups of people towards the Industrial Revolution, eg workers and factory owners DD

    Making a Better World? – Movement of peoples (1750–1901)

  • Issues in everyday life for free settlers, slaves and convicts
  • Students:
  • recognise the differences in everyday life for free settlers, slaves and convicts CCT
  • using a map, locate the movement of: the transatlantic slave trade; free settlers and convicts from Britain to Australia N
  • identify what slaves were used for and where they came from
  • investigate the living, working and social conditions for slaves, using ICT and other sources as appropriate CCICTL
  • identify the reasons convicts were transported to Australia
  • recognise some differences in everyday life for convicts, free settlers and soldiers in Australia CCT
  • identify the living conditions in Australia for the first settlers
  • explore different perspectives of groups who settled in Australia, eg convicts, free settlers, soldiers CCT
  • explore the issues and challenges related to early settlement of Australia, eg living conditions, communication, separation, environment, using ICT and other sources as appropriate CCTICT

    Australia and Asia – Making a nation

  • The colonisation and early settlement of Australia
  • Students:
  • explore the reasons convicts were transported to Australia
  • using a map, locate areas of first settlement in Australia N
  • recognise significant people and/or events in the early settlement of Australia, eg Captain Arthur Phillip, the gold rush, expanding penal settlements
  • recognise important features of Aboriginal culture, eg roles and responsibilities, connection with the land, kinship, traditional stories, music/dance, communication AHCL
  • explore the response of Aboriginal peoples to colonisation, using sources, eg stories, interviews, films, multimedia AHC
  • identify other groups of people who settled in Australia during this time, eg Japanese, Chinese, South Sea Islanders
  • Changes to living conditions in Australia
  • Students:
  • identify living conditions in Australia in the early part of the twentieth century, eg clothing, leisure, transport, food, education, recreation, technology CC
  • compare the lives of young Australians in the early part of the twentieth century with the lives of young people today CCT
  • The contributions of significant Australians
  • Students:
  • explore the contribution of one or more significant Australians during this period, eg Sir Henry Parkes – Federation; Sir Edmund Barton – first Prime Minister of Australia; Sir Charles Kingsford Smith – aviation; Rose Scott – women's movement; John Flynn – Australian Inland Mission; Albert Namatjira – art; Edith Cowan – first female parliamentarian CCTCCAHC
  • recognise the essential features of a democracy CC
  • explore the key roles and responsibilities for citizens in a democracy CC
  • participate in democratic processes at school and/or in the community, eg elect a class or school captain, participate in a community group to clean up the environment CC
  • explore the reasons for Federation, eg currency, defence, transport, trade CC
  • identify people who had no voting rights in 1900, eg some Aboriginal peoples, some women CCEUAHC
  • explore how the rights of women and Aboriginal people changed over time CCEUDDAHC
  • explore what it means to be a citizen of Australia CC
  • investigate ways in which people participate as citizens in Australian society, eg respect for the law, contribution to electoral and democratic processes, behaving in ways which make society fairer or more equitable for all, appreciation of cultural diversity, respect for the rights of all people CCAHCIUDD

    Australia and Asia – Asia and the world (1750–1918)

  • The features of everyday life in an Asian society
  • Students:
  • locate significant countries in Asia A
  • observe some features of a particular Asian society (China, Japan, India), eg housing, food, clothing, recreation, celebrations, education, writing, tools, work, transportation A
  • recognise some aspects of everyday life in a particular Asian society using one or more sources, eg stories, images, multimedia A
  • investigate one or more aspects of everyday life in a particular Asian society, using ICT and other sources as appropriate ALICT
  • recognise some traditions of a particular Asian society that are different from Australian traditions, eg celebrations, religion AIU
  • explore the practices of a particular Asian society, using ICT and other sources as appropriate, eg roles of men and women, governance IUICT
  • using a map, identify the location of a particular Asian society AN
  • explore traditional stories from Asia LAIU
  • identify significant people and/or events of a particular Asian society, eg the Indian Mutiny, Boxer Rebellion, Russo-Japanese War, Swami Vivekananda, Empress Dowager Cixi of China, Emperor Meiji A
  • investigate one or more significant people and/or events of a particular Asian society, using ICT and other sources as appropriate AICT

    Australians at War: World Wars I and II (1914–1918, 1939–1945)

  • This may be taught as a comparative study, or the two wars may be studied separately.
  • Causes of war and where men fought
  • Students:
  • identify some reasons why countries go to war, eg power, protection, different beliefs
  • identify other countries involved in World War I and/or World War II
  • locate on a map the places where Australian forces fought in World War I, eg Turkey (Gallipoli), France, Belgium, the Middle East N
  • locate on a map the places where Australian forces fought in World War II, eg Europe, the Middle East, South-east Asia and the Pacific N
  • Warfare used in World Wars I and II
  • Students:
  • recognise items a soldier would need when going to war, eg uniform, weapons, personal objects
  • recognise the uniforms, weaponry and transport used by Australian troops in World War I, eg infantry uniform, slouch hat, bayonet and rifle, machine gun, aircraft, horse, donkey
  • recognise the uniforms, weaponry and transport used by Australian troops in World War II, eg uniforms for the desert and jungle, slouch hat, helmet, bayonet and rifle, machine gun, flame thrower, tank, jeep, aeroplane
  • Significant events and experiences for Australians at home and at war
  • Students:
  • explore the experiences of a soldier during the wars, eg signing up/attitudes to conscription, life in the trenches (World War I), life on the battlefield in North Africa, South-east Asia or the Pacific Islands (World War II), separation from friends/family, using ICT and other sources as appropriate CCTCCICT
  • explore issues that affected Australians at home during World War I, eg pay and conditions for workers, shortages/rations, attitudes to conscription, communication and information, using ICT and other sources as appropriate CCTEUWEICT
  • investigate the conditions and experiences of the Australian and New Zealand soldiers (ANZACs) at Gallipoli, eg the landing, the trenches, food and water shortages, mateship, relations with Turkish soldiers, evacuation, the role of Simpson and his donkeys, using ICT and other sources as appropriate LICTCCT
  • investigate the changing roles of women during the wars, eg at work, in the home, in volunteer work, politically, using ICT and other sources as appropriate EUDDWE
  • investigate the changes to work on the home front during the wars, eg farms, transport, factories, service, using ICT and other sources as appropriate EUDDWE
  • investigate the conditions, experiences and perspectives of other people involved in the wars, eg sailors, nurses and aircrew, using ICT and other sources as appropriate LICT
  • explore the impact of attacks on the Australian mainland during World War II, eg the bombing of Darwin, submarine attacks in Sydney CCTA
  • investigate the experiences of Australians during the Great Depression, eg daily life, work, education, social life, health in rural and urban communities, using ICT and other sources as appropriate LICT
  • How Australians commemorate the wars
  • Students:
  • explore the main features of the ANZAC legend CC
  • identify how and why Australians have commemorated the wars, eg ANZAC Day and Remembrance Day CC
  • identify memorials in the local area that relate to Australian activities during the wars CC