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NSW Syllabuses

Modules

Year 11 Modules

This module focuses on comprehension, language analysis and developing students' personal, critical and creative responses through interpreting and responding to short texts, for example extracts. They compare and contrast texts and their purposes, audiences and contexts. They develop accuracy in comprehension and proficiency in language analysis, and consolidate and build on skills, knowledge and understanding from English Stage 5. 

Students examine the effects of language choices made by composers (authors, poets, playwrights, directors, designers and so on) on the communication of information, ideas, values and attitudes, and they compose personal, critical and creative responses that are increasingly complex and sophisticated. Through their responding and composing, students consider and reflect on how their own voice is shaped by experiences, cultural backgrounds and schooling.

Students' skills in responding to and composing texts are extended through the study of a range of models along with structured learning activities. Explicit, targeted English language study centres on reading, listening and viewing skills and the language of interpretation and response. Students plan, draft and refine their own written and spoken texts, applying the conventions of syntax, spelling and grammar appropriately for their audience, context and purpose.

Throughout Year 11, students negotiate with their teacher(s) to undertake an appropriate program of wide reading, listening to and viewing of texts, including prose fiction, nonfiction, poetry, drama, film, media and multimedia texts. Students record their responses to the texts they read and reflect on their developing skills in reading, listening, viewing and responding in a wide reading journal.

In this module, students develop understanding, knowledge and appreciation of a substantial literary text. They explore information and ideas that are communicated in and through the text, and they consider the ways in which the content, form and language of the text have been composed and assembled.

Students study one substantial literary text, for example a film, prose fiction, drama or a poetry text, which may constitute a selection of poems from the work of one poet. They experiment with interpretive approaches to examine the text’s meaning and significance. They identify, analyse and respond to the ways in which language shapes meaning in their text, examining the language forms and conventions that are particular to their chosen literary form, and the ways that authors use, manipulate and/or challenge those conventions. 

Through their focused interpretation and analysis of the text, students compose personal, critical and creative responses. Explicit, targeted English language study centres on the conventions of form, structure and style particular to the category of text, and consideration of how these conventions have been used by the composer (the author, poet, playwright, director, designer and so on) to influence responders. Students plan, draft and refine their own written and spoken texts, applying the conventions of syntax, spelling and grammar appropriately for their audience, context and purpose.

As part of their close study, students record their responses to the text and reflect on their developing skills in reading, listening, viewing and responding in their wide reading journal.

In this module, students explore, analyse, respond to and compose a selection of texts that are commonly encountered in community, vocational and academic settings. They investigate how these texts communicate information, ideas, bodies of knowledge, attitudes and belief systems in ways particular to specific areas of society.

Students compare and contrast the types of texts that are used in community interactions, workplace communication and formal learning situations across different disciplines. They identify and explain the purposes, and examine similarities and differences in the language forms and features used, in these types of texts. They consider what the texts indicate and imply about prevailing customs, norms, behaviours and organisational cultures in the social and vocational contexts in which they are used, and the construction of knowledge in particular fields of study and academic disciplines.

Students respond to and compose texts inherent in various settings and roles that are relevant to their needs and interests. Explicit, targeted English language study centres on aspects of language usage for example intercultural communication, technical terminology, semantic fields, appropriacy and jargon, and on analysing how textual forms and features shape meaning and influence responders (the reader, listener, viewer, an audience and so on) within specific situational contexts. Students plan, draft and refine their own written and spoken texts, applying the conventions of syntax, spelling and grammar appropriately for their audience, context and purpose.

Students supplement their study of the module with texts of their own choosing. They record their responses to texts and reflect on their developing skills in reading, listening, viewing and responding in their wide reading journal.

An additional, optional Year 11 module may be developed by teachers to allow for:

  • students' needs, interests and abilities
  • choice of approach
  • choice of texts for study
  • student–teacher negotiation of content. 

Teachers design focuses of learning and a range of activities that provide an appropriate language learning environment for students. Students use their developing English language skills to explore the ways particular texts, forms, media, contexts and aspects of language shape meaning. Students plan, draft and refine their own written and spoken texts, applying the conventions of syntax, spelling and grammar appropriately for their audience, context and purpose.

Students supplement their study of the module with texts of their own choosing. They record their responses to texts and reflect on their developing skills in reading, listening, viewing and responding in their wide reading journal.

 

Year 12 Modules

In this module, students interpret and respond to texts that deal with the question of what it means to be human. They experiment with different approaches to textual appreciation and analysis and consolidate and build on skills in responding and composing from the Year 11 English EAL/D course.

Students explore a range of short texts in a variety of forms and media and they undertake study of one prescribed text. They examine experiences that are represented in texts and they consider and reflect on human qualities and emotions associated with, or arising from, those experiences. In addition, they select one related text and draw from personal experience to make connections between themselves, the world of the text and their wider world. Students reflect on how texts may give insight into the anomalies, paradoxes and inconsistencies in human behaviour and motivations, inviting the responder to see the world differently, to challenge assumptions, ignite new ideas or reflect personally. They may consider the role of storytelling throughout time in communicating and reflecting the human experience. They compare and contrast different versions and accounts of events, personalities, situations and states of being in and across texts, and they investigate and evaluate representations and interpretations of human motivations and behaviour. They compose their own analytical, interpretive and imaginative texts in response to the texts they have studied, and to communicate personal and fictional experiences and perspectives.

Students explore and analyse the ways in which texts are acts of representation. They consider the purpose and context of texts, and describe and evaluate the use of structural, stylistic and linguistic elements to represent human traits, aspirations and behaviours. Explicit, targeted English language study centres on point of view, distinctions and connections between composers, narrators or personas, and characters in texts, and the use of descriptive and expressive language to represent aspects of the ‘human condition’. Students plan, draft and refine their own written and spoken texts, applying the conventions of syntax, spelling and grammar appropriately and with increased confidence and accuracy for their audience, context and purpose.

Language has the power to both reflect and shape individual and collective identity. In this module, students explore and analyse the ways that language is used to express the complexities and subtleties of personal, social and cultural identity. They investigate how textual forms and conventions and language structures and features are used to communicate information, ideas, values and attitudes which inform and influence perceptions of ourselves and other peoples. Students also consider the impact texts have on shaping individuals’ or communities’ sense of identity.

Through the study of one prescribed text and a selection of related material, students develop awareness and understanding of how our perceptions of and relationships with others and the world are shaped by written, spoken and visual language. Through close language study, and by experimenting with different language choices, they consider and reflect on ways that texts affirm or challenge prevailing assumptions and beliefs about individuals and lifestyles, and about social and cultural groupings. They consider representations of and perspectives on culture and identity and they investigate and reflect on their own and others' experiences of adapting to changed circumstances.

Composition focuses on experimentation with variations of purpose, audience and form to create representations of selfhood, affiliation and heritage. Explicit, targeted English language study centres on the Australian vernacular, idioms, colloquialisms and other forms of cultural expression, and the ways that textual forms and features are used to represent aspects of individual and/or collective identity. Students plan, draft and refine their own written and spoken texts, applying the conventions of syntax, spelling and grammar appropriately and with increased confidence and accuracy for their audience, context and purpose.

In this module, students develop an informed understanding, knowledge and appreciation of a substantial text. They explore information, ideas, attitudes and values that are communicated in and through the text, and they examine and reflect on the ways in which the content, form and language of the text have been composed and assembled.

Students study one text chosen from the list of prescribed texts. They engage in extensive exploration and interpretation of the text and the ways the composer (the author, poet, playwright, director, designer and so on) portrays people, ideas and events in the text. By analysing the interplay between the ideas, forms and language within the text, students appreciate how these elements may affect those responding to the text. Students produce personal, critical and creative responses to the text, basing their judgements on a detailed knowledge of the text and its language features.

Explicit, targeted English language study centres on the conventions of form, structure and style particular to the category of text, and investigation and analysis of how these conventions have been manipulated by the composer in order to achieve particular effects. Students plan, draft and refine their own written and spoken texts, applying the conventions of syntax, spelling and grammar appropriately and with increased confidence and accuracy for their audience, context and purpose.

In this concurrent module, students develop and refine their knowledge and skills in writing, speaking and representing. They design and present a range of texts, appropriate to the module being studied, to communicate information, ideas, attitudes and values for different purposes, audiences and contexts.

Students analyse, evaluate and reflect on the expressive, aesthetic and imaginative qualities of the written, spoken and multimodal texts studied in their other HSC modules. Using these texts as models and inspiration, they experiment with techniques, styles and forms in a range of modes and media to produce their own crafted works, for example creative, imaginative, critical, discursive, persuasive and informative texts. Through the process of writing they generate ideas, experiment with techniques, styles and forms, and reflect on the strengths and weaknesses in their compositions and their emerging proficiency as English language users.

Students develop and apply effective editing processes, including the use of assistive technologies, to plan, draft, revise, refine, proofread and publish texts. Explicit, targeted English language study includes research and referencing skills, and implementing and maintaining ethical practices and standards when responding to and composing texts. Students plan, draft and refine their own written and spoken texts, applying the conventions of syntax, spelling and grammar appropriately and with increased confidence and accuracy for their audience, context and purpose.